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PopWrapped | Current Events

Kentucky Print Shop Holds Tight To Discrimination By Refusing Service To Gays And Potty Mouths

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PopWrapped

Updated 05/1/2014 12:48pm
Kentucky Print Shop Holds Tight To Discrimination By Refusing Service To Gays And Potty Mouths
Media Courtesy of Herald Embroidery Store Front

Margie Patton

Staff Writer

@MargiePatton

It seems like a print shop in Kentucky needs to learn the difference between a genuine right to refuse service claim and blatant discrimination. Herald Embroidery in Oak Grove recently made the news with its refusal to produce LGBT-themed products and, more shockingly, its ban of LGBT customers seeking any services. Stickers on the store’s front window had made it very clear what product content and which types of customers the business deemed acceptable and unacceptable. Images of the “John 3:16” Bible verse, a gun, and a bearded male face received the green circle of approval, while “foul language” and the LGBT-pride rainbow flag were marked with the famous red circle-and-slash “prohibited” graphic. After news of the ban hit media outlets, shop owner Matthew Lombard replaced the series of symbols with a sign that reads: “While we will serve all customers who treat our place of business with respect, we reserve the right to refuse to produce promotional products that promote ideas that are not in keeping with our consciences. This includes, but is not limited to content promoting homosexuality, freemasonry, the use of foul language, and imagery which promotes immodesty.” Although often a grey area, it seems Herald Embroidery’s refusal to print certain products is within their First Amendment rights. Refusing to serve customers based on sexual orientation, however, is certainly not. A customer described a past experience on the shop’s Google Plus page. Jeri Vercetti wrote: “My wife and I went into this shop to get shirts for my parent's anniversary. We went in holding hands and the clerks gave us dirty looks the entire time. We didn't understand why; maybe they thought we were suspicious? I confronted one of the employees and they directed me to a sticker in the window. It had a pride flag on it and it basically meant gays weren't welcome. My wife and I were heartbroken; we just wanted shirts made!” In response to the allegation, Lombard told Instinct Magazine, “We will not serve people that are foul-mouthed, nor will we serve people that flaunt their homosexual lifestyle in our place of business and/or request us to produce promotional products that do so." Negative reviews of the business continue to mount, but as of yet, no legal action has been taken against the store by any customer. Keep up with PopWrapped for more on this story as it develops. Keep Up With PopWrapped On The Web!

     
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