Appearance
photo 2 options
  • Logo

    Uploading…
    Photo Uploaded
    Error!
  • Footer Logo

    Uploading…
    Photo Uploaded
    Error!
color 6 options

Success!

Your settings have been saved.

Current Events PopWrapped | Current Events

Woman's Suffrage Ratification Celebrates 95th Anniversary

Dani Strehle | PopWrapped Author

Dani Strehle

08/19/2015 3:06 pm
PopWrapped | Current Events
Woman's Suffrage Ratification Celebrates 95th Anniversary
Media Courtesy of Wikipedia

The year was 2004, the election was Bush/Kerry and I was 19-years-old. It was the first major election I was of legal age to vote in. Two semesters of Government courses with a completely biased, Conservative teacher and a mandatory assembly in which I was forced to listen to Republican Congressman Steve Chabot drone on endlessly had solidified my personal political  narrative. I was a loud and proud democrat; a tiny liberal minnow swimming in a conservative shark tank. My mother was thrilled. My father? Not-so-much.

Suffrage Wikipedia

I arose that morning at 6:30 am sharp (a personal best for me, at that point), and accompanied my mom to the local church where our neighborhood voted (no, the irony was not lost on me). I giddily, and meticulously, filled out my ballot and submitted it to the kindly older gentleman at the front table (this was before digital ballot machines were implemented everywhere). I collected my "I Voted!" sticker and was on my way. It was a landmark day in my life.

Suffrage Wikipedia

Despite the fact that I was like a teenage girl waiting in line for One Direction tickets in my excitement, the historical impact of the morning's events never resonated with me. When you're 19, the truth behind every-day-things sometimes doesn't seem as important as the actual task at hand. 11 years after that first fateful ballot submission, and I'm happy to say that my perspective has ballooned and I'm able to see just how incredibly lucky I was to be able to submit that ballot at all.

Suffrage Wikipedia

On this day, 95 years ago, the Nineteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution was ratified, granting women the right to vote. For 70 years, woman suffragists battled for the right(s) that we all enjoy today. Strong, brilliant women who understood the absolute need for equality and for the imbalance of power to be corrected. Today, I pay tribute to those women, and I thank them for helping to create a better world for myself, and for my daughters.

Here are just a few of the fierce women that sparked this important movement.

Suffrage

Wikipedia

Annie Arniel: Arrested on 8 separate occasions for standing up for what she believed in. Also a member of the Silent Sentinels.

Suffrage

Wikipedia

Sojourner Truth: Born into slavery, Truth was an American abolitionist and fierce Woman's Rights Activist. She actually ESCAPED slavery with her infant daughter in 1828. She later returned to her slaver for her son and shockingly won her case, making her the first black woman to win a court case against a white man. Her extemporaneous speech in Akron in 1848, aptly titled "Ain't I a Woman?" remains a battle cry for girl power to this day. 

Suffrage

Wikipedia

Carrie Chapman Catt: According to Wikipedia, "Catt served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and was the founder of the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women."  She also led an army of women to try and persuade congress to give women the vote. Her life before and after the suffrage movement is one that will give all you slackers serious inferiority complexes.

Suffrage

Wikipedia

Ida B. Wells: Wells was a journalist, a newspaper editor, suffragist, sociologist and an active member of the Civil Rights Movement. She used her journalistic prowess to document lynching and pointed out that it was used as a punishment for blacks, rather than a deterrent for crime. She also spearheaded several women's rights organizations, and documented the suffrage movement. She is an inspiration.

Suffrage

Wikipedia

Lydia Chapin Taft: Taft was the first woman to legally place her vote in Colonial America. What a magnificent honor to hold. 

Suffrage

Wikipedia

Susan B. Anthony: Put simply, the world would not be as it is today were it not for Susan B. Anthony. She presented Congress with the actual amendment that would come to be known as The Anthony Amendment, or as we call it now, the Nineteenth Amendment.

This is but a very small sample of the many, many women that changed the world. It's because of them that I get so angry when I hear women and girls claim that they are "not feminists." It's BECAUSE of these women that you are even able to make an absurd claim such as that one. It is because of these women that you are able to choose whether you get married, have kids, stay home, work, shave your legs, go to college, wear a dress, involve yourself in political debates, own property, buy a car and run for office.

Whether the movement is something you want to claim as your own or not, every woman owes it to themselves and their sisters to live their lives the way these warriors envisioned it. With conviction and strength, and without any sort of "submissive" undertones. You are worth so much more than that.

Thank you to the suffragists for fighting so that I may live (somewhat) equally among men. Your courage and sacrifice will not soon be forgotten.

Below is a list of all of the known participants in the American Suffragist Movement. May they rest peacefully in the knowledge that their fight was not in vain.


Share


Are you sure you want to delete this?

ConfirmCancel